Illuminated Morte d’Arthur

Morte d’Arthur, a poem by Alfred Tennyson, written out and illuminated by Alberto Sangorski; 1912; Reproduced by the Graphic Engraving Co. for Chatto & Windus, London.

“Alfred Lord Tennyson’s Morte d’Arthur, written as early as the spring of 1835, was a retelling of the third, fourth and fifth chapters of the twenty-first book of Malory’s Romance about the legendary King Arthur, Guinevere, Lancelot, and the Knights of the Round Table. Tennyson later would incorporate a much extended and altered version of the poem into his The Idylls of the King, as the last section titled ‘The Passing of Arthur’.

The illuminator Alberto Sangorski (1862-1932) was late to the world of calligraphy, at the age of 43 beginning to work for his younger brother Francis in the famous Sangorski and Sutcliffe bookbinding firm. One of his greatest achievements was a unique jewel bound version of Omar Khayyám’s Rubáiyát, now referred to as ‘the Great Omar,’ which never reached the American collector who commissioned it as it was sent across on the ill fated Titanic in 1912.”The Public Domain Review

Click the screen shot above to read the 60 page book or go to Internet Archive to find out more about it and download the book in many formats including EPUB, Kindle, PDF and others.

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5 Comments

Filed under History of Books & Libraries

5 responses to “Illuminated Morte d’Arthur

  1. Art of the Book.
    Book as Art.
    Art as Book.
    Beautiful. Talent knows no age or time limits.

  2. I taught my 1st and 2nd graders about illuminations in our writing and language arts sessions. They loved them! From time to time throughout the year one would pop up in the children’s writing samples. I loved it!
    ~Lynda

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